Studying a foreign language makes your brain grow

If you need some extra motivational factors to keep your Swedish lessons going, then how about this one: a new study shows that studying a foreign language actually makes your brain grow.

The study compared language students who studied a foreign language full time with students who studied other topics full time (for ex medical students). Their brains were scanned before and after a 3 month intensive study period.

Whereas the other students’ brains were unchanged, the language students’ brains had increased in volume in specific areas: the hippocampus and three areas of the cerebral cortex.

Students with larger increases of volume in hippocampus and superior temporal gyrus (a part of cerebral cortex associated with language learning) did better in the language classes. Students who found the language learning process harder had a larger volume increase in the “motorical part” of cerebral cortex (middle frontal gyrus).

All in all, the researchers conclude that their research demonstrate that foreign language learning is a good way of keeping your brain active. This is also further confirmed by previous studies that have shown that bi- and multilingual people develop Alzheimers later than other groups.

Read more about the study here and here.

Is Swedish hard to learn?

Is Swedish hard to learn?

Well, it depends, of course. It depends on what your native language is, and whether it is close to Swedish. So for example, if your native language is German, then Swedish will be quite easy to learn. It also depends on the complexity of the language. For an English speaker, Swedish is not that complex, compared to many other languages. Compared to English, the pronunciation may be a bit of a challenge. Swedish has a lot of vowels, in fact 9: a, e, i, o, u, y, å, ä, and ö. Swedish also has some particular sounds that do not sound quite like they are spelled (for ex: sj-, stj-, skj-). If you are not used to grammatical genders, the idea of using ‘en’ and ‘ett’ in front of the nouns seem weird to start with. And when you learn more about the grammar, you will find out that the concept of en and ett can also be seen on other words in the language – they kind of ‘rub off’ on other words (adjectives and possessive pronouns, typically).

It of course also depends on how much time you devote per week to studying Swedish (the more often you study, the quicker you will learn), what resources you have available and your motivation for studying.

According to The Foreign Service Institute of the U.S. Department of State, Swedish is in fact on of the easier languages to learn. Good news! If you are a native English speaker, it should take you approximately 575-600 class hours to learn Swedish to a proficient level. This is relatively easy, compared to some of the hardest languages – for example Japanese, Arabic and Chinese will take approximately 2,200 class hours to learn!

Also, have a look at the blog post I have written previously about how many hours it takes to learn Swedish.

Hard-Languages-To-Learn

Christmas gift – Swedish Lesson

Want to give someone a Swedish Lesson as a Christmas Gift?

No problems!

Email us on swedishmadeeasy@gmail.com and let me know the person’s name, and we will send you payment details. You pay for the lesson (£27 GBP), tell them to contact us to book the lesson themselves. We’ll give you a pdf voucher that you can print out and wrap up.

Lätt som en plätt! Easy peasy!

Screen Shot 2014-12-12 at 10.20.26