It’s Valborg on Monday!

Happy Valborg!

Valborg is the name of the 30th of April in Sweden. In Sweden, this is celebrated by lighting bonfires (majbrasor) all around the country in the evening, and people gather to watch the bonfires. Some places have fireworks (fyrverkerier). Once the bonfire is lit, it is traditional for a men’s choir (manskör) to sing traditional songs about the spring, and for someone to hold a speech.

Valborg

Valborg, Stockholm (Hammarby skidbacke) 2012

Valborg got its name from an Anglo-Saxon missionary, who lived during the 700th century BC. According to legend, she was an English princess who were called to Germany to help evangelise the pagan Germans. She was made a saint year 870, and during medieval times, a cult developed in her memory. This cult believed in protecting themselves from witchcraft, and in order to protect themselves from witches, people started to light bonfires in Germany.

In Sweden, people thought that the night between 30th of April and 1st of May was a magical night, when witches and other magical beings appeared to meet the Devil. Therefore, they lit bonfires and made noises to try and scare the beings away.

It also happens to be the birthday of the Swedish King – Carl XVI Gustaf! Grattis kungen!

Carl XVI Gustaf

Grattis på födelsedagen!

Valborg is one of the main days of festivities at universities and colleges, as this is the time when the students put on their traditional student caps (which marks the end of the final exam periods and the beginning of celebrations). In university cities, especially Uppsala and Lund, the whole day is packed with activities and celebrations and begin already in the morning with champagne breakfast in nearby parks.

studentmössa på Valborg

Pic from http://www.lexiophiles.com/svenska/studentmossor-och-skumpa

The most traditional song is “Vintern rasat” (it’s actually called “Längtan till landet” but it most known by its first two words: Vintern rasat). Herman Sätherberg (1812-1897) wrote the lyrics and the music was written by Otto Lindblad (1809-1864).

Vintern rasat

Swedish and English lyrics (translation from semiswede) – and here you can listen to a performance of the song.

Vintern rasat ut bland våra fjällar,
Winter stormed out among our mountains,
drivans blommor smälta ned och dö.
snow drifts melt down and die.
Himlen ler i vårens ljusa kvällar,
The sky smiles in spring’s bright evenings
solen kysser liv i skog och sjö.
The sun kisses life into the forest and lake.

Snart är sommarn här i purpurvågor,
Soon summer is here in purple waves,
guldbelagda, azurskiftande
gold-coated, azure-shifting
ligga ängarne i dagens lågor,
lie meadows in daylit flames (strong sunlight on a spring day),
och i lunden dansa källorne.
and in the grove dance källorne (the light streams and dances). 

Ja, jag kommer! Hälsen, glada vindar,
Yes, I’m coming! Greetings, cheerful winds,
ut till landet, ut till fåglarne,
out to the country, out to the birds,
att jag älskar dem, till björk och lindar,
that I love, to birch and linden trees,
sjö och berg, jag vill dem återse,
lake and mountain, I want them see again,

se dem än som i min barndoms stunder
see them like in my childhood memories
följa bäckens dans till klarnad sjö,
follow the dancing creek to the clear lake,
trastens sång i furuskogens lunder,
the thrush’s song in the pine forest groves,
vattenfågelns lek kring fjärd och ö.
waterfowl play around the bay and island.

Glad Valborg! / Anneli

Lessons, prices and online booking system here.

Who let the cows out? Kosläpp season starts now

Kosläpp

In Sweden, we do appreciate signs of spring (vårtecken). It could be spotting the first tussilago, listening to the dripping sound of melting snow, or visiting art galleries when they open for the season. Another fun and enjoyable vårtecken is that of kosläpp.

Throughout April and May in Sweden, there will be kosläpp on many farms in Sweden. This is a rather lovely event, where the farms let the cows out for the summer. Not surprisingly, the cows are very happy about it – and they show it too. They turn into playful little puppies! Apart from the sheer joy of being able to be outside and eat fresh grass (grönbete), the cows also work out their hierarchies in the herd.

Screen Shot 2015-05-01 at 11.58.48

Screen Shot 2015-05-01 at 12.02.13

Screen Shot 2015-05-01 at 12.02.04

Screen Shot 2015-05-01 at 12.01.53

Many farms open up to visitors, so they can come and enjoy the spectacle. The events have become real tourist attractions, and many farms are already fully booked in terms of audience capacity. It’s a fun and enjoyable way to celebrate the arrival of spring, visitors bring picknick and spend a bit of time looking around the farms. And the interest for these events is apparently increasing year by year. In 2005, only a few thousand people came to the farms of the producer Arla, whereas around 150,000 people came in 2014. Some believe the interest is growing as there is a larger divide between city and country today. Only a few decades ago, it wasn’t uncommon for someone to have a grandparent who ran a farm, whereas today it is not quite as common. Perhaps many people feel an urge to get closer to nature and animals.

There is also an idiomatic expression that stems from this occasion: glad som en kalv på grönbete.

Here are some of the Arla farms schedules for this year’s kosläpp.

 

95 ways of saying ‘rubbing snow in someone’s face’

A common conception is that Eskimos have over 100 words for snow, as they have so much snow in their everyday lives. By the looks of things, Swedes spend the whole winters rubbing snow in each others’ faces – at least judging by a survey a few years ago that found 95 ways of saying ‘rubbing snow in someone’s face’.

The survey was carried out by a radio programme on Swedish radio (Språket i P1), asking what words people use, or have used as children, to describe the act of ‘rubbing snow in someone’s face’. 6,000 people from the whole of Sweden participated in the survey, which revealed 95 ways of saying this. Here are some of the verbs, from south to north.

Malmö
80 people use the word mula.

Skåne
In the rest of Skåne, mula dominates, but not as clearly as in Malmö.
Mula 267, kröna 53, tvätta 17, salta 10, mosa 7, sylta 4, gnida in 4, gnugga 3
The survey states that kröna is typical of Skåne.

Blekinge
The survey found one unique word in this region: mora.
Mula 32, mora 24, gno 7, mosa 5, döpa 2
It is interesting to see how different the words are in Blekinge, compared to Skåne – even though they are so close geographically.

Halland
The Halland-dialect also had a unique word: molla.
Mula 91, molla 29, möla 13, klena 4, göra 4, kröna 3

Småland
There were large variations throughout Småland, but the general trend is as follows:
Mula 311, mylla 79, bryna 19, myla 16, mosa 12, gno 11, mulla 6, myra 2
Notice how some of the words form a kind of cluster, which is probably illustrating how one form has transformed into another one. This is probably the case with for example mula, mulla, myla, mylla and myra.

Apart from mula, mylla is considered typical for Småland.
Among people born after 1970, almost only mula and mylla are mentioned.

Öland
Mula 14, mylla 4, pula 2
Very similar overall patterns to Småland in general, according to the survey.

Gotland
Bryna 19, mula 12, bröine 3
Bryna is the typical word for Gotland.

Östergötland
Myla 148, mula 142, pula 5, mylla 3
Myla is typical for this region. It is also interesting to note only 3 examples of mylla, which is the typical expression of Småland, just south of Östergötland.

Södermanland
Mula 126, pula 87, pöla 23, snöpula 5, möla 4
There was only 1 example of myla in Södermanland, which was the typical word in Östergötland – the neighbouring region. Some of the strong dialect boundaries are fascinating, don’t you think? Instead, Södermaland belongs to a greater pula-area, which can be found in Närke, Västmanland and neighbouring regions.

Västergötland
Mula 206, göra 86, grosa 23, möla 18, tvätta 16, gnosa 12, pula 9, gno 8, mylla 6, snötvätta 5, gni(da) 5, gnugga 4, sylta 4
Mula is top of the chart here, and möla is probably also a variation of mula.
Typical for Västergötland is the (hard g -pronounced) göra as well as grosa och gnosa.

Göteborg
Mula 159, göra 69, gira 43, môla 36, sylta 34, gura 16, salta 3

Typical for Göteborg is mula och môla, but also the words göra, gira, gura and sylta. Gura and sylta is not as common among younger people, but göra, gira and môla could be found across generations.

Bohuslän
Mula 66, môla 11, mulla 9, mölla 7
All appears to be variations of mula.

Dalsland
Mula 17, môla 7, tryna 7
The last form, tryna, can also be found in Värmland.

Värmland
Kryna 81, mula 45, tryna 27, krôna 14, bryna 11, mölla 7, mölja 7, pula 5, snöbryna 3
Typical for Värmland are kryna, tryna, bryna and krôna. Together, they are three times as common as mula. Mula and tryna are common among younger, whereas kryna, bryna and krôna are less common.

Närke
Pula 56, mula 35, snöpula 6, snötvätta 5
Pula is clearly dominating in this region.

Västmanland
Pula 64, mula 35, snöpula 6, bryna 2, tryna 2, snöpudra 2
Very similar pattern to Närke.

Uppland
Mula 153, mulla 62, pula 24, snöpula 5, mudda 5, snömulla 3
Typical for Uppland is mulla.

Stockholm
Mula 800, pula 8
Stockholm is suprisingly homogeneous, despite a total of 843 participants: 98 % state mula. How come Stockholm has not been influenced by neighbouring regions?

Gästrikland
Purra 18, pula 18, mula 15, snöpula 11, snöpurra 9, snötvätta 2
Typical for Gästrikland is purra and pula.

Hälsingland
Pula 31, mula 27, snöpula 9
Hälsingland also belongs to the pula-area.

Medelpad
Mula 58, pula 2
Pula pretty much stops by the border between Hälsingland and Medelpad.

Dalarna
Mula 55, pula 45, snöpula 13, myla 6, möla 3, mulla 3, snötvätta 3
Dalarna also belongs to the pula-area. But how about myla – are there any connections to Östergötland?

Härjedalen
Mula 5.
Lack of participants here.

Jämtland
Mula 45, purra 21, pula 8, döpa 7
Typical was purra, alongside mula. Purra is thus used in both Jämtland and Gästrikland, even though these areas do not share any borders.

Lappland
Mula 11, pula 7, möla 3, myla 2, snödöpa 2

Ångermanland
Mula 78, mjula 6, mjöla 4, pula 3
Mula is definitely dominating.

Västerbotten
Mula 78, mubba 10, möla 7, snödränka 6, mobba 5, möla 3, pula 3, snödöpa 3, snömula 3, döpa 2, tvätta 2, mööl 2
Second most common word was the unusual mubba, which was only used by participants born between 1950 and 1970. However, it may be related to the word mobba (bullying), which would make sense.

Norrbotten
Mula 47, snöbada 29, snödöpa 7, snödoppa 4, gnida 4
Typical for Norrbotten are combinations with snö. 21 different words were mentioned, for example måda, mosa, gnugga, gnogg and, from Överkalix, gnäir.

Finnish variations:

Österbotten: mula 3, pesa 3, tvätta 2, tåväl 1, såvla 1, dövla 1, myla 1

Nyland: mula 6, pesa 6, tvätta 3, snötvätta 2

Åboland: mula 5, pula 2, snötvätta 2

Åland: måda 5, skura 2, mula 1, gnosa 1, gno in 1

In Österbotten and Nyland, the word pesa comes from the finish word for ‘tvätta‘ (to wash) with a Swedish infinitive form.

Mula

Mula

Interview with a Swedish learner – James

Learning Swedish – interview with a learner

James is a radiographer working in an NHS hospital in the UK. He was raised in Southport, Lancashire, but currently lives in Grimsby, Lincolnshire, UK, but he is hoping on finding work in Sweden in the not-too-distant future. James likes to ride his bicycles a lot and successfully completed Vätternrundan, a 180 mile ride around Lake Vättern, in Sweden in 2015.

IMG_1298

What led you to want to learn Swedish?

I’ve always been interested in Nordic history and culture, the cause of which was probably being exposed to a 1980s adventure game I used to play on my computer as a boy called Valhalla. More recently, I had been looking at job adverts for jobs in my profession across Norway, Sweden and Denmark, and wishing I could apply for them. But after separate trips to Sweden, Norway and Finland, and enjoying experiencing life as a tourist in those countries, in 2014 I thought I’d bite the bullet and give learning a language a go. I plumped for Sweden as I felt the size of the country would be good.

When and how did you start learning Swedish?

I started using the Babbel app on my iPad, in May 2014, and shortly after started taking lessons from Anneli over Skype.

How much do you currently use the Swedish language, and why?

I try to use it when I can. The chances to use Swedish in the UK are limited but there’s a few groups across the country that arrange meetings through the meetup.com website, in London, Manchester and Glasgow. Other than that, if I visit Sweden I try to use my language skills there, but this is made more difficult by the natives’ excellent English skills and their eagerness to use them in conversation with an Englishman!

What have been the challenges for you in learning Swedish?

Trying to fit my lessons and homework around my job and other interests.

What is your proudest moment as a Swedish speaker?

When arriving on a campsite in June 2015, I did manage to hold a good conversation with the management telling them my name and that I had booked a pitch for a few nights. I think they may have been confused by my arriving in a right hand drive car!

Can you recommend any Swedish books that are good for learning Swedish?

Swedish: An Essential Grammar, by Philip Holmes and Ian Hinchliffe, is an excellent grammar book for those starting out in Swedish.

Can you recommend any online / media resources for learning Swedish?

The aforementioned Babbel app, which you can use on iOS and Android, plus their version for desktop computers, is excellent but you have to pay a monthly subscription to use it. You could consider switching your phone’s language setting to Swedish, although it may be a good idea to memorise how to switch the language back to English should you need to. Swedish TV shows seem to be quite in demand on UK television these days with Wallander and The Bridge being shown on the BBC and there’s plenty of DVDs of Swedish TV shows available too, with English subtitling of course, plus you could consider watching English language films with Swedish subtitling. Listen to Swedish records, from the likes of Melissa Horn and Linnea Henriksson, and have a look at the lyrics booklet with the album.

Do you have any other advice for future, budding Swedish learners?

Learn little and often, maybe try and think about what you’re doing in Swedish rather than English, maybe keep a written diary in Swedish and write about your days.

 

10 unmissable bars in Stockholm

Want some tips on where to go for a drink in Stockholm? The following list includes 10 bars, courtesy of The Local: http://www.thelocal.se/20150429/ten-unmissable-outdoor-bars-in-stockholm

1. Södra Teatern and Mosebacke, Södermalm

https://jonteupplever.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/a882c-djuret-7.jpg

2. Mälarpaviljongen, Kungsholmen

Mälarpaviljongen, Kungsholmen

3. Orangeriet, Kungsholmen

Screen Shot 2015-05-15 at 14.28.56

4. Rosendals Trädgård, Djurgården

Screen Shot 2015-05-15 at 14.30.46

5. Josefina, Djurgården

Screen Shot 2015-05-15 at 14.34.54

6. Nosh and Chow, Östermalm

Screen Shot 2015-05-15 at 14.36.41

7. Piren, Kungsholmen

Screen Shot 2015-05-15 at 14.37.43

8. Pharmarium, Gamla Stan

Screen Shot 2015-05-15 at 14.38.52

9. Berns, Östermalm

Screen Shot 2015-05-15 at 14.40.06

10. Trädgården, Södermalm

Screen Shot 2015-05-15 at 14.41.43

http://www.thelocal.se/20150429/ten-unmissable-outdoor-bars-in-stockholm

 

 

Redo för ett nytt år!

Hej alla!

Gott Nytt 2013! I hope you have all had a nice relaxing time and are ready to get back into your svenskalektioner again? I have just got back from 10 days in Sweden – Stockholm and mainly Dalarna – and I am really excited about getting started again with lessons this year and help you improve your Swedish even more.

They say you should study the professionals if you want to excel in something. Therefore I thought I’ll share some typical characteristics of successful language learners, which I hope will be inspiring and motivating.

I hope to see and speak with you all real soon. In the meantime I’ll also leave you with some pictures from a magical dog sledging – hundspann – experience that me and my husband had in Orsa, Dalarna last week. We absolutely loved it – det var helt underbart!

Hälsningar – Anneli 🙂

See Northern Lights in Sweden

The Northern Lights (Aurora Borealis, or Norrsken/Polarsken in Swedish), is the natural light display in the sky particularly in the high northern latitude regions. It happens due to the collision of energetic charged particles with atoms in the high altitude atmosphere.

The result is stunning.

In Sweden, one of the best places to catch a glimpse of this phenomenon is Abisko Mountain Station in the very north.

Travel

Best way to get there is to fly to Arlanda, Stockholm and then catch a regional flight with Scandinavian Airlines to Kiruna. From there, you can rent a car and drive the 1.5 hours northwest to Abisko Mountain Station. You can also take the bus or train from Kiruna Airport to Abisko. Furthermore, you can book a Taxi with City Taxi at +46(0)980-61500 and it cost about 1000 SEK from the airport to Abisko.

You can also take the train all the way, but it will take you between 18-20 hours to get there.

Accommodation

The winter season starts in December. You can rent rooms and cabins at the mountain station.

Twin-bedded room: from 740 SEK /room
Bed: from 270 SEK /person
Double room: from 1360 SEK /room

Additional fee for non-members : 100 SEK per person per night, children 50 SEK per person per night

There is a Sky Station that you can visit to view the Northern Lights (695 SEK), and there are also many different package options available.

For more information, visit the FAQ section at the Abisko Mountain Station website.