Tycka, tänka, tro and how to use them

Sweden winter

If you find the verbs tycka, tro and tänka difficult to remember, you are NOT alone. The English word think corresponds to three Swedish verbs: tycka, tänka, and tro, something that likely causes confusion for non-native speakers. It can be tricky because the translation of the verbs can sometimes overlap each other. However, it’s not as complex as it might sound, but takes time and practice to get used to. In this post, we will look at when and how to use these words. At the end of this post, we also have a free Cheat Sheet that you can download and keep somewhere handy to remind yourself.

Sexy in Swedish – 44 romantic Swedish phrases

“All I want for Christmas is you!” When you are learning Swedish, chances are that the course books include everyday language that is very helpful for getting by in Sweden in general. However, you will probably not find intimate and sexy phrases in these types of books. Here are 44 phrases that you can use when getting to know someone, either face-to-face or via a dating app. So let’s get festive and romantic with some useful Swedish phrases for these situations!

What can I expect from a Swedish lesson?

What are lessons with Swedish Made Easy like? How do we work, and what material do we use? How can you best prepare for your Skype lesson? In this blogpost we’ll look at what lessons with us usually look like. Our lessons usually include the following: brief improvised conversation (to get used to real-life conversations) … Read moreWhat can I expect from a Swedish lesson?

How long to learn Swedish

Many students ask how long it takes to learn Swedish. We have previously written a longer blog post about it, but we have now also worked out a little rough guideline to how many hours it usually takes to reach each language level. This is a very rough estimate, and can vary considerably between individuals, … Read moreHow long to learn Swedish

Interview with a Swedish learner – Jamie

This week’s interviewee is Jamie. He is 36 years old and from Ottawa, Canada. He moved to Stockholm in 2015 after meeting his wife. In some ways he says he is a typical Canadian- he loves Hockey and Maple Syrup! He also loves his adopted homeland Sweden. He received his citizenship in 2018 and feels … Read moreInterview with a Swedish learner – Jamie

Får får får?

Hej! Daniel here. In this week’s blog post I’ll help you to make sense of the Swedish word får. Får får får? is a Swedish pun that means “Do sheep get sheep?” (meaning Do sheep have (baby) sheep? or What’s the word for baby sheep?) Many languages have what I call ‘hiccups’: words that can … Read moreFår får får?

Interview with a Swedish learner – Marilena

Marilena is a biologist who is lucky enough to work as a researcher in one of the most well-known institutes in Europe. She arrived in Sweden a couple of years ago, moving from her home country, Greece, to work in Stockholm. Even though Swedish winters are hard for Mediterranean people, she loves Stockholm for its … Read moreInterview with a Swedish learner – Marilena

Hen – the debated Swedish pronoun

A note on hen Hej! Anneli here. You may have heard of the gender neutral Swedish pronoun “hen“. It has been debated in Sweden during the past decade, and some people feel strongly about it. So what’s the fuss all about? Swedish gender and pronouns The Swedish language, like German, used to have three grammatical … Read moreHen – the debated Swedish pronoun

Letters we don’t pronounce

Letters we don’t pronounce Hej! Daniel here! In this week’s blogpost, we’re talking pronunciation. We have a saying in Sweden that goes Har man sagt A får man säga B (If you’ve said A, you should say B). However, this doesn’t translate into how Swedes actually speak; the saying continues with …så får vi C vad … Read moreLetters we don’t pronounce